Oracle “Human Talks” Episode 3: Guest, Matthew Jurosek

H3 HR Advisors is excited to share a new video series we have in partnership with Oracle.  Human Talks is a show where we talk to HCM practitioners, analysts, and Oracle partners.  Each episode is approximately 5 minutes, so well worth your time in hearing what is happening in the world of HCM.  These episodes were recorded at HCM World 2016.

Please check out our third episode with Matthew Jurosek.  Matt is a Sales Engineer for Workforce Software.  Workforce Software  provides tailored solutions to empower enterprise and mid‐sized organizations to fully automate time, labor, and workforce scheduling processes, simplify absence management, and enable strategic business insight.

We talked to Matt about working with technology in union environments.  Being able to track absence compliance and all of the types of leaves are examples of the complexity that they help organizations deal with.  Check it out! Also, be sure to connect with Oracle and Workforce Software.

Thank you for watching.  Be sure to visit the Oracle site for more information about Oracle and HCM World 2017.

Oracle “Human Talks” Show: Guest, Tim Hickey of Exelon

H3 HR Advisors is excited to share a new video series we have in partnership with Oracle.  Human Talks is a show where we talk to HCM practitioners, analysts, and Oracle partners.  Each episode is approximately 5 minutes, so well worth your time in hearing what is happening in the world of HCM.  These episodes were recorded at HCM World 2016.

Please check out our second episode with Tim Hickey.  Tim is the Director of HR Strategic Services at Exelon.  Exelon is the largest utility and largest nuclear operator in the US.  With over 30,000 employees, Tim’s job reaches across many of the HR issues other organizations face.  We talked to him about some of those issues, including how organizations are implementing modern HR technology.  Check it out! Also, be sure to connect with Oracle and Exelon on Twitter.

 

Thank you for watching.  Be sure to visit the Oracle site for more information about Oracle and HCM World 2017.

Trish McFarlane on the Future of Work: Live from Inforum

I had the privilege of being a keynote speaker at Infor‘s Inforum 2016 a few weeks ago. If you’re not familiar with Infor, they provide comprehensive suites that have industry-specific functionality.  Their solutions consist of ERP, HCM, supply chain management, CRM, asset management, financials, and HCM.  Infor may have embraced HCM through a variety of acquisitions, but they have reinvented these into a powerful set of cloud-based human capital management solutions built to adapt to the organization’s evolving business strategy.

I was fortunate to be asked to share my thoughts on the future of work with the Inforum 2016 attendees.  With so many trends being discussed in the industry, I keyed in on a few I think are most important to HR leaders, practitioners and other business leaders.  Thanks in advance for watching and feel free to share any comments or your ideas about the future of work with me in the comments section.

In the growing field of HCM suite providers, Infor remains one to watch!

Announcing the HR Happy Hour Podcast Network!

Today is a big day for H3 HR Advisors, and specifically, for the HR Happy Hour podcast.  Steve Boese, my co-host, created the show back in 2009.  I was a listener and guest host until 2013, when I joined officially as a co-host.  Since then, we’ve talked to business leaders, technology solution providers, authors and more.  We’ve shared research and ideas on how to make your business better.  It’s been such a great experience and we’re so proud that our listener network has grown so much.  That growth led us to the realization that even more shows are needed.  This is where things get exciting.

Today is the official launch of the HR Happy Hour Podcast Network, and the details of the three new shows that will soon debut on the HR Happy Hour umbrella. We are thrilled to be joined by such a great lineup of shows and contributors, and you can read the details of the announcement HERE.

 

And now with the launch of the new HR Happy Hour Network (details are in the release here), we are partnering with George LaRocque, Ben Eubanks, Madeline Laurano, and Mollie Lombardi in what we know will be an exciting new group of shows.  Their shows will expand on topics that Steve and I know are important to not only the HCM industry, but to businesses globally.

Many thanks to everyone who has listened to, supported, or even guested on the show so far – stay tuned for more great and informative content, HR and HR technology insights, and hopefully – lots of fun from your pals at the HR Happy Hour Show and Network.

Oracle “Human Talks” Show: Guest, Brent Skinner

H3 HR Advisors is excited to share a new video series we have in partnership with Oracle.  Human Talks is a show where we talk to HCM practitioners, analysts, and Oracle partners.  Each episode is approximately 5 minutes, so well worth your time in hearing what is happening in the world of HCM.  These episodes were recorded at HCM World 2016.

Please check out the first episode with one of our favorite industry analysts, Brent Skinner, Principal Analyst at Nucleus Research.  Brent shares information on what their research is uncovering about performance management and learning and the impact from HCM technology.  He also touches on how predictive analytics plays out in the workplace.  Be sure to connect with Brent and Nucleus Research to learn more.

 

Thank you for watching.  Be sure to visit the Oracle site for more information about Oracle and HCM World 2017.

Executive Perspectives: Impact of Digital Transformation

Digital transformation is a topic that comes up every time I talk with leaders.  Whether you’re in human resources, finance, IT or in other parts of the organization, the impact of digital and how it’s transforming the way we work is top of mind.  I am partnering with Infor on a series of webinars to help executives gain perspective and insight on many of the ways technology is changing the workplace.

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Please join me tomorrow, July 27th,  for a free webinar with Infor execs, Charles Cagle and Bill Vellante, as we discuss the ways leaders can be ready for the changes.   Register here today.

#AmericansInLondon A Collaborative Look at HR Learning in London

I’m HUNGRY!

By Frank Zupan, Director of Talent Management at Associated Materials

12813971_10156716950515523_388711202620285107_nI hate that feeling…I was hungry. I was REALLY hungry. One of those times when I didn’t even realize how long it’s been since I’d eaten and I’m thinking, “Holy Crap, I’m so hungry, I’m dying here”. Come to find out I wasn’t really hungry for food, I was hungry for learning.

My Q4-Q1 work schedule as a corporate Director of Talent Management had been a bit brutal. A new boss, several enterprise-wide and functional initiatives on both recruiting and development sides of my “shop” with lots of heavy lifting, travel and deliverables. All leaving very little time to feed my learning needs. I was REALLY, REALLY hungry when I saw Bill Boorman’s Facebook post at the end of February about how the fast-approaching March #trulondon was shaping up. It appeared to be shaping up very nicely indeed. Over 100 registered, a very strong group of track leaders with solid topics, an “interesting” location, so of course I, randomly and without any clear strategy, clicked and registered to attend an unconference in London which was now less than three weeks away.

Of course two minutes after I’d registered Bill messaged me asking if I’d like to be a track leader. The great thing about the tru track format is that it’s part knowledge, part experience, part improv and ALL about the discussion. Suffice to say I’m now able to add “tru Track Leader” to my LinkedIn profile!

What a great decision! <patting myself on the back>. Add to the reasons listed above, I could also plan visits with friends and colleagues that I hadn’t seen since working in UK in 2006, jump on an opportunity to attend #HRTechWorld being held in London the following two days, and connect with some HR leadership pals that I hadn’t seen in some time, hence the #AmericansInLondon hashtag. #winning

Ultimately, and fortunately, I responded to an internal need that I hadn’t yet recognized or acknowledged…I was REALLY hungry for learning! And I was able to satisfy that incredible hunger with a fantastic learning experience at #trulondon and was lucky enough to connect that to extra learning at #HRTechWorld. Fantastic experiences at both events, connecting with old and new friends during a few days of serious learning and networking…WOW, did I ever need that! Add to all of this several great discussions with current technology partners to my business, and I would return to the States quite happy.

If you’re REALLY hungry for learning, you’re not alone. Whether through random circumstances from your “world of work”, or if you haven’t taken time to develop a learning strategy, my suggestion is to <continue to> connect online with the people driving the creation and development of professional and social communities. Find them, connect with them, talk to them, read their stuff, meet with them, learn from them, let them learn from you, and every once in a while, say YES to investing in your own development…or just stay HUNGRY.

 

Wake Up Kids! We’ve Got the Dreamers Disease

By Trish McFarlane, CEO of H3 HR Advisors

1545675_10156716950235523_5452239827204249531_nIf you’re like me, you’re someone who dreams about the future of HR. You think about doing things differently and shaking things up in the industry. One of the best ways I’ve found of feeding this addiction of mine is to network and learn from other dreamers in the industry. As someone who is fortunate enough to call this crazy HCM space my home, I go to my fair share of events. Each time I leave, I assess whether the time I spent was worth it or not, aka was my “inner dreamer” satisfied. Most recently, I attended TRULondon and HR Tech World. So, what makes these two fall in the “worth it” category?

As a destination, I can’t think of a single downside of attending an event in London. The only thing to keep in mind is giving yourself a little extra time to see a few of the best things London has to offer. If you’ve never been, the city is easy to navigate thanks to the Tube and trains. You can get almost anywhere in the city in a short time and wont’ need to rent a car. Add to that the numerous museums, eclectic restaurants, clubs, shopping and the ever-popular tourist attractions and it’s a great place to visit. From the dreamer perspective, there is a sense of wonderment and history that you can’t achieve anywhere in the U.S.

TRULondon

I’ve been attending the recruiting unconference for six years. It’s changed quite a bit over the years and as it’s developed, it is now one of the best places in the world (yes, in the whole world) to meet with recruiters, sourcers, talent acquisition leaders, marketing pros, solution providers and practitioners. The secret sauce for this event is that you walk in and immediately feel part of a community and a movement.

People who attend are tired of the status quo. They don’t want to do what everyone else is doing. They are there to challenge their own perceptions… and yours. They have the dreamer’s disease and they are going to make sure you have it too.   It’s a deliciously, wonderful mix of learning, networking and chaos. With Bill Boorman at the helm and the partnership of Noel Cocca and Matt Charney of RecruitingBlogs and Recruiting Daily, this is not only a great use of your time, but your money.

Track leaders managed to challenge us by thinking about how to apply the way auto dealers market to the way we market our businesses to candidates. They threw out the notion that we’ll all be out of work because the robots are taking over, well, at least the idea is that most of the recruiting function will be handled by automated systems that “learn” as they are used. Track leaders also cursed and laughed as they shared hacks for creating content. There were Tech Labs and product Show & Tell labs. It was a mash-up of all things great in the recruiting industry and the future to come.

HR Tech World

Attending my first HR Tech World was an experience. It’s a more intimate experience that provides all the learning and vendor interaction you’d expect from an event like this. From a forward-facing, dreamer lens, their solid focus on the numerous startups in the HR tech space is what drew me in. Not only were the startups available to learn about, there were specific disruptive sessions focused on the direction of the industry. Add to that a fun, informative “pitch” session by five of the startups and it made for an interesting day.

If you have the dreamer’s disease like me, check out both of these events and follow them online. They will point you to learning all year long and really help you challenge your approach.

People Talking

By Michael Heller, CEO & Founder of iRevu

1916154_10156716951180523_8415946151352119352_nI have been practicing human resources for years – practicing being the operative word. The more I learn about people, the less I feel I truly know. Therefore, I don’t expect to necessarily master the discipline as much as continue to become better at it. But along my way, I have picked up a few things: Most problems can be solved by listening sincerely and being empathetic. Throwing money at something might correct an issue short term, but rarely long term. My favorite? Never EVER judge a book by its cover. Never.

In 2015 I attended my very first TRU event. I ‘knew’ Bill Boorman from his online presence and met him for the first time in Las Vegas at a conference. He didn’t strike me as the typical HR professional, but had knowledge spewing out the brim of his trademark hat. He mentioned that he hosts an event – The Recruiting Un-conference – designed to get people talking.

“Get people talking?”

“That’s right, mate. People talking.”

What struck me was his emphasis on the ‘people’. Color me intrigued. The conferences / meetups / seminars I’d been to definitely had people talking. At the front of a room. With a slide deck and a quick wit. Don’t get me wrong, these people talking were great. They were armed with data and knowledge and technology and eloquence. But these people talking were talking TO me. Maybe at me? I don’t know, I tweeted a ton, got some great nuggets and if I stood in line I might be able to say a quick hello and introduce myself. This was my typical experience at a typical conference.

Bill told me that the TRU events are different. I realized instantly that he wasn’t joking. When I arrived to the venue this year, The King’s Head, it looked like a proper English pub. A pub?? For an HR Conference?? Walking inside, there were drinks and taxidermy. In every room, from the armed chimpanzee in the basement to the giraffes and tigers in the boudoir. I have to admit the butterfly room freaked me out a little. But, remember, don’t judge a book by its cover and: “People talking”.

So when he kicked off the event, there were a few takeaways. No name badges ensures that everyone is on a level playing field. No inflated titles, no fancy companies. If someone said something interesting and you want to meet them, by all means introduce yourself! The sessions are super topical and led by international HR A-Listers. People like William Tincup, Matt Charney, Trish McFarlane, Noel Cocca, and Stephen O’Donnell.

But the sessions (called tracks) are also different – the good session leaders are NOT there to show you how smart they are. They show you how smart and innovative YOU are. They are roundtable-esque discussions where everyone is encouraged to participate and share their experiences and thoughts. Anyone can participate, everyone learns. Everyone wins.

TRU events are extremely valuable. There’s a warmth and affability about them that draws you in, even when the discussion gets heated. In one session, ‘The Day in the Life of a Recruiter – how we spend our time?’ the leader asked as much and then stepped back while the track attendees discussed everything from sourcing to relationship building to extinguishing the fire du jour. In this session, the what wasn’t as valuable as the how. The attendees were so diverse and their approach so varied, I saw so many nodding their head and saying ‘wow, I never thought about that.’ I plan on attending TRU events for a long time to come.

This year TRU London helped me lower my associative barriers even further and I am better for it. Sure, I got to lead a track session and show and tell a software product. I got to meet people IRL I’ve only followed on twitter. But, I learned from everyone there – from the A-Listers to the regular people like me. If you want to wear a name badge and talk about what’s already happened, this is not your conference. However, if you want to be immersed in real discussion about what’s happening and will likely happen, you owe it to yourself to attend at least one TRU. Just be ready for the venue to spark as much conversation as the topics.

 

 

 

 

Betting on Gender Pay Equality: How Long Will It Take?

*Today’s guest post is by Mary Sue Rogers (@msrlondon on Twitter).  With over 30 years of experience in Human Capital and Talent Management, Mary Sue has been instrumental in building highly successful outsourcing, consulting and HR technology practices in NA, EMEA and Asia Pacific.  In addition to Human Capital, she is passionate about investing in the future – especially when it comes to women and children.  Spare time is travelling to places that provide great scuba diving.  You can reach out to her directly via her blog SaveHR.com.

There have been several recent articles on the gender pay gap, with various predictions on how long it will take to truly achieve pay equity. Research done by “Right Time” a company in the Manpower Group, said 17 years. Another prediction in the Guardian says 118 years. Personally, I am going with the 118 years if I had to bet.

Closeup of assorted coins.

Here are some reasons why:

  1. The time when the first countries granted women the right to vote (for example NZ) to the last (Saudi Arabia), has been approximately 120 years. The Vatican is the only place in the world that women cannot vote.
  2. It was over 40 years ago that the Equal Rights Amendment was approved by the USA House and Senate, but it was never ratified by enough states, and died in 1982.
  3. It has been only 50 years since the UK and USA banned specifying a preferred gender in recruitment ads, and there are countries where this is still allowed. Japan only passed guidelines in 2015.
  4. It has been just over 40 years since women in the USA who were not married, did not have to have a man guarantee their bank loan irrespective of their financial net worth.
  5. The equal pay act in the USA, UK, and Australia has been in place less than 50 years. For some countries, like Switzerland, it has been less than 25 years.

So if you were Hilary Clinton, when you left University at age 21, it was still legal to specify gender in a recruitment ad. She would have had to ask her dad to co-sign for a loan, and if she was born in the UK, it would have been legal to discriminate due to gender.

For Ginni Rometty, Meg Whitman or Mary Barra, CEO’s of some of the world’s largest companies, when they graduated from university the USA was struggling to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. In the UK they would have been taxed with their husbands and not as individuals. If they were in Japan, they would not have been able to keep their name when they got married, they had to change to their husbands.

If you were Indra Nooyi, CEO of Pepsi Co, who was born in India, it was even more challenging as India did not give women the right to vote until 1945. This was just 10 years before she was born. Things were similar for Angela Merkel who was born in the old GDR (East Germany), which was under Russian rule until 1954, the year she was born.

If you used historical change to forecast the future you would most likely bet with the Guardian prediction of 118 years. In 2014, the median full-time wage and salary for women was 81% of what it was for men, according to the latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics. The 19 cent difference is an improvement from 38 cents in 1979. So 35 years to gain 19 cents. And according to the same source, the difference has remained between 17 and 20 cents for the past dozen years. So forecasting would put you at best case around 35 years, worse case forever.

Equal pay is very important for global and local economic and social wellbeing. We should get there as fast as we can, but if I was going to have a flutter on when based on history I would place my bet with the 100 versus the 20 years. Maybe governments and business around the world will prove me wrong.